Childcare regulations and inspection of childcare & play are changing…..again from April 2016 in Wales

February 16th, 2016

The Childminding Cafe February 2016 Blog

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

New legislation means Childminders have more flexibility

January 18th, 2016

 

New legislation means more flexibility for childminders

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

New Inspection Judgements from September 2015

December 11th, 2015

New Inspection Judgements for Childminders

 

New eBook available to download for members at www.thechildmindingcafe.co.uk  – Completing your Self-Evaluation Form (2015) our guide to completing Ofsted’s Self Evaluation.

 

From September 2015 all providers including childminders must comply with the new inspection framework.  There will be four graded judgements – as there are now – and these will be applied across all settings through the introduction of the Common Inspection Framework. This framework will be supported by individual handbooks addressing the characteristics of each of the following sectors: maintained schools, further education and skills, non-association independent schools and early years.

The four graded judgement areas will be:

  • effectiveness of leadership and management
  • personal development, behaviour and welfare
  • teaching, learning and assessment
  • outcomes for children and learners

Greater emphasis will be placed on safeguarding and the curriculum.

Please note: Although information may suggest that inspections in the future will be shorter (this only applies to schools and further education establishments.  Therefore, Ofsted do not intend to introduce shorter inspections for early years providers including childminders.

What does the new inspection framework mean for childminders?

I suspect you already practice to the highest standards to meet requirements set; however, some changes in the way you present your evidence and making various amendments may be required once you assess what you already have in place.

The format of the day will largely depend on the areas of focus but inevitably safeguarding, the curriculum, behaviour, outcomes for children and the quality of teaching will all be explored.

How can I prepare for this? What is the inspector looking for?

You can access the document “Early Years Inspection Handbook” this became available from September 2015 (150068), Ofsted 2015.  This will provide information on everything you need to know to help you prepare for your inspection.

This also can be an excellent tool to use as a self reflection exercise to prepare for your inspection.   By using the Grade Descriptors and asking yourself questions such as “am I/are we doing this? How am I doing this? What evidence can I display to support what I am doing? Are you exceeding the criteria are there areas for improvement to ensure I reach that level.  Using both this guidance and your self evaluation form will help improve your practice and prepare you in advance for your inspection.

It is good practice to always include the views of parents and carers, detailing what do they think about your provision?  Also consider what children like about the care they receive? Perhaps seek feedback from other childminders or assistants that you may work with or have engagement with.

Methods of support that may be available for you to seek additional assistance with your self-evaluation may include:

  • Local Authority quality improvement schemes
  • Childminding Networks
  • A reflective diary
  • Parent Questionnaires
  • Child Questionnaires
  • A professional development plan
  • Evaluating your training course – consider what impact they have on your practice.
  • Network meetings to share ideas of best practice with others

Tip:  We suggest revisiting your last inspection report to remind yourself of any previous actions or recommendations.  The inspector will be looking for evidence to support your action plan and may ask question to assess how you have addressed those actions and recommendations since your last inspection.

Having all your documentation and supporting evidence already prepared in one place around your due inspection will allow the inspector to proceed with the inspection allowing you to carry out your daily routine and not interfere with interacting with your children.

Also available to download:  Guidance to help you complete your Ofsted Self Evaluation Form

Sources:

Ofsted: “Early years inspection handbook” (ref: 150068). Crown copyright 2015

Ofsted: “Early years self-evaluation form guidance” (ref:120342). Crown copyright 2015

Ofsted: The common inspection framework: education, skills and early years: (ref: 150065). Crown copyright 2015 

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Working with assistant childminders

November 23rd, 2015

Guide to working with assistant childminders

Introduction

When considering working with or employing assistants to care for children within your business, we suggest developing an appropriate childminder assistant pack that may help you organise your paperwork and build a more effective working environment.

Points to remember when planning to work with assistants:

Being the registered childminder means you are the main carer for all children within your setting.  You will be accountable for them and would need to supervise the work any assistants do.  If agreements have been made by Ofsted in advance permission may be allowed for assistants to work alone for short periods of time.

Although you are entitled to have more than one assistant, you must have no more than three people in any one day caring for the children within your setting.

Guidance for steps to be taken:

EYFS Suitable PersonAll childminders/assistants must be suitable to fulfil the requirements of their roles and understand what their responsibilities are.  Complete effective checks to ensure assistants are suitable for the role; see (CR3.1).

Ofsted EY2 FormIf you work with or employ assistants you must complete a Declaration and Consent form for each individual – The law states that all childminders must inform Ofsted about any planned arrangements including their name and address of any assistants before employing or using them (Ofsted, 2012).

Recruitment Procedures – Vigorous recruitment procedures must be undertaken, these include: an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check (this can be obtained through Ofsted, a charge of £44.00 is usually expected for these checks).  Two relevant references will be required, a full breakdown of employment history, undertake relevant interviews and may be required to obtain medical information.

Employment – Provide a clear job description which detail their roles and responsibilities, a contract with a written statement of the main terms and conditions of employment (include hours of work, salary and holiday entitlement).  Explain with assistants any sickness pay, annual leave and disciplinary policy and procedures that you have in place.

Supervision – (The EYFS SF, 3.41) states that you are accountable for and must supervise the quality of the work of any assistants, and must be satisfied that they are competent in the areas of work they undertake.  Childminders can leave assistants alone with children for up to 2 hours in any one day; this can only be undertaken with written signed parental permission prior to the care being given.  However, if assistants are left in sole charge of children, no more than six children must be under eight and only three of those children can be in the Early Years age group, only one child must be under one.  You must ensure staff to child ratio is met within current standards set at all times.

Age of assistants – Assistants aged 17 years of age can be included in the ratios set within the Early Years Register and assistants aged 18 and over for the Childcare Register.

Additional Children Working with more than one assistant may allow you to increase the number of children you care for.  The maximum number must not exceed six children under the age of eight for each adult.  Some restrictions may apply and limit your ratios dependent on the space available within your setting and further restrictions that may have been imposed by Ofsted.  It may be necessary to apply for planning permission to run your business from home, you must ensure adequate furniture and equipment is readily available to accommodate additional children.  Consider any changes will enable you to deliver effective learning and development requirements of the EYFS to all children attending your setting.

Make sure you have informed your insurance company of any changes, and you must by law hold a relevant in-date employers liability certificate to cover assistants working within your setting.

Good Practice

Although no requirement has been set within the EYFS to carry out appraisals with your assistants or volunteers that may work with you, it is good practice to provide ongoing meetings to discuss how your progress is with those working with you.  Developing a portfolio for both the childminder and assistants is a positive way to set realistic goals for your growing business.   In addition, having to hand a clear portfolio will support your ongoing self evaluation and help inspectors make judgments in the following areas “Effectiveness of leadership and management” for example: will demonstrate your ability to improve staff  practice performance management and appropriate training needs.

Questions you may ask consider asking your assistant during your appraisals:

  • What communicating methods do you use to ensure you work in partnership?
  • Do you feel you have any personal strengths and/or weaknesses?
  • Have you identified any areas of improvement since your last meeting/appraisal? (if already undertaken)
  • Do you have any concerns that may affect your daily practice?
  • Are you facing any difficult challenges in your work at present?

Our new resource “Childminding Assistant Portfolio Summary guide” will be available for members to access or download from the 1st December 2015. The document gives excellent ideas for childminders who would like to build a portfolio for childminding assistants.  This will be a valuable resource to demonstrate your professionalism and reflect on your provision.

Thanks for reading

Donna

Sources:

Requirements of the Childcare Register.  Childminders and home childcarers. August 2014, No: 080161

www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/080161

 

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Child Car Seat or Booster Seat: What the Law says

November 12th, 2015

 

Are you aware of the rules that apply to safeguarding children in travelling vehicles?

GOV.UK state that all children travelling in cars must be restrained in appropriate car seats dependant on their age, height and/or weight dependant on the individual seats.  It is important that all childminders are aware of the changes to legislation.

Children must use a child car seat until they are 12 years old or 135cm tall, whichever comes first.

Only EU-approved car seats can be used in the UK.  These will have a label on the seat showing a capital ‘E’ in a circle.

Children’s car seats can be chosen based on the height or weight of the child you care for.

Height Based car seats – these are known as ‘i-Size’ seats and must be only used rear-facing until the child you care for is over 15 months old.  Only after reaching 15 months old can a child be placed forward-facing in a car seat.

It is your responsibility to check the seat to make certain it is suitable for the height of your child.

Weight Based car seats – these car seats must be rear-facing until a child weighs more than 9kg (equal to 19.8 lbs).

Once a child reaches the appropriate weight you may use a seat for a child forward-facing if you choose (dependant on the way the seat can be used and the way a child must be restrained in it) depending on their weight.

There is more than one type of car seat to choose from:

Child’s Weight                        Car Seat

0kg to 25kg                                    Rear-facing baby carrier, or rear-facing baby seat using a harness

9kg to 18kg                                     Rear or Forward-facing baby seat using a harness or safety shield

15kg to 36kg                                   Forward-facing child seat (High-backed booster seat) using a seatbelt

Over 22kg                                       Booster cushion

You can find information on how to choose a car seat and travel safely with children in cars at http://www.childcarseats.org.uk/choosing-using

Fitting a child car seat:

You must only use a child car seat if your car seat belt has a diagonal strap, or otherwise

  • Specifically designed for use with a lap seat belt
  • Fitted using ISOFIX anchor points

You must also:

  • Deactivate any front airbags before fitting a rear-facing baby seat in a front seat
  • Not fit a child car seat in side-facing seats

Children with disabilities   

The same rules apply for children you care for who have disabilities unless it is advised by a doctor to say that they are exempt on medical grounds.  Children can use a disabled person’s seat belt or child restraint designed for their individual needs.

When can a Child travel without a car seat?

In some circumstances a child is allowed to travel without a car seat

  • When travelling in a taxi or minicab (private hire vehicles)

In a licensed taxi or minicab

  • Children under 3 years of age are allowed to travel without a child’s car seat or seat belt, they must be accompanied only on the back seat
  • Children aged 3 years and over can travel without a child’s car seat if they wear an adult seat belt

Minibuses, coaches and vans

 Minibus or coach drivers and companies are not required to provide child car seats.  As a child carer it is

your responsibility to provide your own if you want to make sure a child has one.

  • Children can travel without a car seat or seat belt, if they are not available on a coach.
  • The rules for travelling with a child in a van are the same as those for cars.

Unexpected Journeys

If a correct child seat is not available, a child aged 3 years of age can use an adult seat belt if the journey is all of the following:

  • Unexpected
  • Necessary
  • Over a short distance

Please note you cannot take a child under 3 in a vehicle without a seat belt or the correct child car seat (except travelling in a taxi or minicab.

No room for a third child seat

Children under 3 years of age must be in a child car seat.  If no room is available for a third child seat in the back of the vehicle, the child must travel in the front seat with the correct child seat.

Children over 3 can sit in the back using an adult belt.

Vehicles without seat belts

Children under 3 years of age must be in a child car seat.  If a seat belt is not available the child cannot travel.

A child over 3 years can travel in the back seat without a car seat and without a seat belt if the vehicle does not provide any restraints.

Remember keep your child safe at all times, check your children’s restraints on every journey!

Thanks for reading

Donna

Sources:

GOV.UK

Car seats: the law

RoSPA 2014

Department for Transport.

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

The Integrated Review

September 23rd, 2015

Introducing the new Integrated Review

Introduction

For the past few years you may have been carrying out the Progress Check at Age 2 for the toddlers that you care for. From this September local authorities, health visitors and early years practitioners are expected to come together to replace this with an integrated health and early education review.

It is suggested that by bringing together the reviews those involved will be able to identify problems and offer effective early interventions to those that need more support, at an age where interventions can be more effective than they would be for an older child. The age specified is between two years and two and a half years.

Purpose of the Integrated Review

The NCB state that the purpose of the review is to:

  • Identify the child’s progress, strengths and needs at this age in order to promote positive outcomes in health and wellbeing, learning and behaviour
  • Facilitate appropriate intervention and support for children and their families, especially those for whom progress is less than expected
  • Generate information which can be used to plan services and contribute to the reduction of inequalities in children’s outcomes

Principles of the Integrated Review

There are thee key principles of the Integrated Review, in summary these are:

  1. The Integrated Review should engage parents, particularly those that are disadvantaged
  2. The Integrated Review should engage the child, where they are participating
  3. The Integrated Review should be a process of shared decision making

How the Integrated Review will be delivered

It is for local areas to determine how best to deliver the Integrated Review in their region. Given this your local authority may be leading a piece of work to develop delivery of the Integrated Review and so we suggest you get in touch with your local Childcare Development Officer to find out how the Integrated Review will be delivered in your area. In case it helps, we have updated our Progress Check at Age 2 template to reflect the new NCB overarching guidance and have changed it to ‘The Integrated Review – Early Years Practitioner Review’.

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

 

Promoting British Values

August 26th, 2015

Promoting British Values

There is now a steer for early years providers to promote British values. In this blog we look at this steer and what promoting British values means.

The requirement

The promotion of British values is stated in a number of Ofsted and Government documents, for example:

  • In the new Common inspection framework: education, skills and early years, under the section detailing what inspectors will consider when making judgements on the effectiveness of leadership and management (clause 28) it states that the inspector will make a judgement on the extent to which leaders, managers and governors actively promote British values.
  • In the new Early Years Inspection Handbook it again states that the evaluation of the effectiveness of leadership and management will include the extent to which the promotion of British values is promoted. Further the Handbook states the effectiveness of leadership and management may be judged as inadequate if “Equality, diversity and British values are not actively promoted in practice”.
  • In the HM Government document “Prevent Duty Guidance: For England and Wales” it states that “Early education funding regulations have been amended in England to ensure that providers that fail to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs do not receive funding from local authorities for the free early years entitlement.”

Definition of British Values

The Prevent Duty Guidance seems to define British values as “democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs”.

We discuss how you could support the promotion of British values in our latest eBook Promoting British Values’ We have also created a Promoting British Values policy which members can download and amend to suit their setting.

Thanks for reading

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Ofsted inspection notifications

August 19th, 2015

Notification of Ofsted Inspections for childminders

Previously childminders have had up to 5 days notification of an inspection, the new guidance in the common inspection framework suggests that this has now been changed to “The setting will normally receive a telephone call at or just after midday on the working day before the start of the inspection”. However in his letter to all early years providers in August 2015, Sir Michael Wilshaw HMCI stated that “the arrangements for [notification of] inspections of childminders will not change under the common inspection framework”, indicating (we think) that childminders will still have 5 days notice.

Ofsted inspection changes – the new Early Years Inspection Handbook

July 24th, 2015

 Changes to Ofsted Early Years Inspections

The Early Years Handbook

From September 2015, there is a new Early Years Handbook that describes the main activities Ofsted inspectors should undertake when they conduct early years inspections. It replaces previous documents ‘Conducting early years inspections’ and ‘Evaluation schedule for inspections of early years provision’. The Handbook fits into a new common Ofsted inspection framework, a framework that aligns inspections across all of Ofsted’s educational remits. The Handbook has two parts: [Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

Our fully revised ‘What to expect at your next inspection’ eBook, available to all members to download, provides greater detail on what you can now expect at your next inspection, from September 2015.

Thanks for reading

Amanda

Sources:

Ofsted: The common inspection framework: education, skills and early years

Ofsted: Early years inspection handbook

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Is a child in you care starting school in September?

June 12th, 2015

Hi everyone,

It is likely that many of you will have children in your setting that will be moving on to school in September and you may be thinking about how you can support the child to make the transition as seamless as possible. You may well have already set the foundations, but if not we have some ideas and a new resource to help:

[Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

I hope these have given you some ideas, either if you have a child starting school in September or if you want to prepare for September 2016. As always, it is vital that you keep parents updated on your strategies and to ensure that they are happy with what you are doing to aid transition. They may have suggestions for other activities too and may want to be involved in every step.

Thanks for reading Amanda

 

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Prevent Duty Guidance for England & Wales

April 29th, 2015

Prevent Duty Guidance: For England & Wales

You may have heard about the new Prevent Duty Guidance that has been published recently. This document provides guidance on the requirement in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 for ‘specified authorities’, including registered Childminders, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”.

The Prevent Duty Guidance can be downloaded from our Government & Ofsted documents page.

The term ‘Due regard’ effectively means that you shouldn’t need to undertake any new function, but rather that you should place an appropriate amount of weight on the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism when you consider all the other factors relevant to how you carry out your usual activities. The Guidance identifies best practice for the Early Years sector (as well as others) and describes ways in which Early Years providers can comply with the duty. It also shows clear links between the duty and what is already required in the EYFS regulations. Pages 10-12 are specific to the Early Years sector. The Guidance also includes sources of further advice and provides information on how compliance with the duty will be monitored.

The Guidance is a relatively short document so I would encourage you to take a look, however I have tried to summarise the main points here: [Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

The following resources have been updated to reflect these changes:

I hope this has been helpful, as always please remember that this is our interpretation of the document and that we recommend you have a read of the document and speak to your Local Authority for any clarification.

Thank you for reading,

Amanda

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Your Alternative Care Plan

April 17th, 2015

Your Alternative Care Plan

What would you do if you couldn’t look after your minded children at short notice?

It’s a good idea to have a plan in place that sets out what you would do if suddenly you are unable to care for your minded children as planned. This will help you to know what to do and will help parents to understand what to expect in these circumstances.

We have developed an ‘Alternative Care’ template that you can adapt to suit your childminding setting. It covers what you could do in the following three scenarios:

  1. When you have scheduled commitments (e.g. a training course on a Thursday in two weeks time)
  2. When you have unscheduled commitments but do not have children currently in your care (e.g. the boiler in your home breaks down on a Sunday and you have no heating in the middle of winter)
  3. When you have unscheduled commitments and have children in your care (e.g. you suddenly need to take a child to hospital)

Members can download our Alternative Care template from our Management Resources page now.

Thank you for reading,

Amanda

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Revised Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice

March 22nd, 2015

Revised SEND Code of Practice becomes Statutory Guidance from 1st April 2015

Last year we wrote about the (then) new Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice, which become statutory in September 2014. Since then the DfE have published a revised edition, which will be statutory from 1st April 2015. This is a large document that covers young people between 0 – 25 years.

There are not many differences relevant for childminders between the original and the revised versions. I have taken a read through, comparing the two versions and think that the main change is that now [Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Timing changes to Ofsted inspections

March 9th, 2015

Timing changes to Ofsted inspections

Ofsted has recently published an updated version of their publication entitled “The framework for the regulation and inspection of provision on the Early Years Register”. In this new version there is a couple of changes to timescales that you may not be aware of:

[Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Using questionnaires to improve your setting

January 23rd, 2015

Using questionnaires to improve your setting

At your next Ofsted inspection it is likely that the Ofsted inspector will look for evidence on how you use self-evaluation in prioritisation and setting challenging targets for improvement. This would likely include views of parents and children. Questionnaires can be a great way of helping to achieve this and we have created five different ones for you to use. All are available to download from our Leadership & Management page.

Parents & Carers’ Questionnaire

Our original questionnaire, this questionnaire asks questions across the four themes of:

  • A unique child;
  • Positive relationships;
  • Enabling environments; and
  • Learning & Development

parents questionnaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can ask parents to complete the questionnaire at any time and can update them a couple of months later letting them know what changes you have implemented thanks to their feedback.

Child’s Questionnaire

This is a questionnaire for the younger children in your setting. There are words and pictures and children can mark the smilie, okay or sad faces to show how they feel about things in the setting such as the food and toys.

Again you can give this to children at any time.

childs questionnaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Older Child’s Questionnaire

As the name suggests this is a questionnaire for older children who can read questions and write down their feedback. Again, it can be given to older children at any time.

Parent Terminates Contract Questionnaire

For use when a parent terminates their contract with you – asks some questions that you may want to know the answer to but would be uncomfortable asking verbally.

Older Child’s Leaving Questionnaire

To give to an older child prior to them leaving your setting.

I hope these five questionnaires are useful, they can all be downloaded by members from our Leadership & Management page and can be amended to suit your setting. If you would like any others created please let me know.

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Preparing for adverse weather

December 18th, 2014

Are you ready for the arrival of adverse weather?

So far winter has been quite kind, but it is likely that at some point, we will have a a cold snap. Rather than panic if you suddenly wake up to snow, it might be a good idea to get prepared. To help, we have a Bad weather policy that you could adapt to reduce the downside of bad weather on your business. Members can download it for free now from our Policies & Procedures page.

When developing your Bad weather policy, whether or not you use our template, there are a number of areas we think you should consider:

1. How you will ensure parents are aware that whilst you recognise their need for reliable childcare, there may be times when, due to bad weather, you may need to alter your normal offering at short notice.

2. How you will reduce the impact of bad weather on the operation of your setting, for example through:

  • Asking parents to provide winter outdoor wear for their child
  • Clearing snow from your path / driveway as soon as practical
  • Updating parents regularly on the status of your setting, so that they can plan for contingencies or be reassured that your setting is open.

3. How setting opening hours may change in the event of bad weather – both when the weather turns bad during normal opening hours and when bad weather arrives overnight.

4. What you will charge if you have to close due to bad weather.

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

Do you have a child with an allergic condition in your care?

September 28th, 2014

Allergy support

According to Allergy UK 50% of children in the UK suffer from allergies. Unfortunately this means it’s very likely that you’ll care for a child at some point who suffers from an allergic condition. Given this, as Allergy UK says, the ability to understand allergic conditions and deal with sudden or severe symptoms, is fast becoming an essential part of childcare.

Most likely you ask if the parent/carer if their child has an allergy at the start of the childminding relationship – but what do you do if the answer is ‘yes’?

[Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

Source used in the document:

http://www.allergyuk.org/

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

 

Changes to the Childcare Register

September 20th, 2014

Changes to the Childcare Register

Hi everyone

Introduction

 

 

 

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

Source used in the document:

Foundation Years / 4Children: http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/2014/07/guide-to-the-send-reforms/

SEND Code of Practice June 2014 – DfE.

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

 

SEND Local offer info and resources

August 28th, 2014

The new SEND Code of Practice and the Local Offer

Hi everyone

Introduction

On 1st September 2014 the Government will introduce new legislation to support children and young people between the ages of 0 – 25 years who have special educational needs and/or disabilities. The legislation will be introduced through the Children and Families Act 2014 and the new Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Code of Practice: 0-25 years.

All registered Childminders need to be aware of the requirements that this legislation has on local authorities and early years practitioners. In this blog we give our thoughts on what the legislation means for childminders as well as information on the resources we have developed to help you comply.

[Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

Source used in the document:

Foundation Years / 4Children: http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/2014/07/guide-to-the-send-reforms/

SEND Code of Practice June 2014 – DfE.

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.

 

EYFS 2014 – What you need to know in ten simple points

July 27th, 2014

EYFS 2014

Hi everyone

With holidays on our minds September seems a long way off, but when it arrives so will the new EYFS 2014 regulations. Hopefully you will get at least one quiet day during August to just digest the changes and prepare your setting for the new framework.

To make it as easy as possible we highlight here ten key things we think you should know about  EYFS 2014. [Content protected for Members only, please either login or become a member to read this content]

Thanks for reading,

Amanda

Source used in the document: 

Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage (2014) March 2014 – DfE

Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage changes 2014 – Foundation Years

 

The information contained in our blogs, newsletters, resources and website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by us and we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to our blogs, newsletters and website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website, blog or newsletters for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of our blogs, newsletters, resources or website.